Chronicle

Vol. 1 Issue 1

PATRICK TREFZ

PHOTOS & CONVERSATION

  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ
  • PATRICK TREFZ

Where do you currently reside?

In Santa Cruz, CA—up in the sticks.

When did you realize you wanted to take photos?  

When I was drawing portraits of an imaginary family from an African tribe at age eight.

What’s your Camera of choice, and why?

I love my Rolleiflex twin lens medium format that my dad bought in 1966. The images are super sharp and have a very nice contrast range—something you cannot create with any other camera out there. The camera is rock-solid, very reliable—no batteries, no light meter, it will never break down on you.

But on the opposite spectrum, I am really digging the new Canon c300 camera that puts out amazing imagery—very neutral looking raw files that have a bit of the warmth and dimension of the Kodachrome 64 film stock.

How did your father influence your photography?

He used to work out of Paris in a giant photo studio where he produced work for Vogue and others. Whenever I came to visit, I was just psyched on it; it really got my creativity going at an early age.

Who do you look up to in photography and movie making?

Robert Frank’s always been a big inspiration; his thoroughly composed, dark and moody images have always stirred something up inside of me.

I have been a longtime Werner Herzog fan ever since I watched ‘Fiztcarraldo’ when it first came out. He truly believes in his own vision and doesn’t take any shortcuts in getting things done. To quote him: “If you want to do a film, steal a camera, steal raw stock, sneak into a lab, and do it!”

What made you want to compile the body of work for Surfers’ Blood?

Surfers’ Blood is the outcome of twenty years of following the surfers DNA, being half participant, half anthropologist. Passion is where your heart is pumping through your veins.

What’s your perception of the modern day surf industry?

It is all you want it to be—the good, the bad, and the ugly. It is a commercial endeavor, but I see some incredibly creative and brave things coming out of it. It’s fun to watch and fun to be a part of.

What’s the most important thing in life for you?

Being able to take the time to watch birds fly.

 

patricktrefz.com

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